Outline for three sessions on mindfulness for chronic pain

Bezsheiko, Vitaliy. “Mindfulness is effective in chronic pain. Psychosomatic Medicine and General Practice, vol. 3, no, 2, 2017. Full text at: https://e-medjournal.com/index.php/psp/article/view/70. Accessed 9 Sep 2017.


Sleep problems among older adults

MacLeod, S., et al. Practical non-pharmacological intervention approaches for sleep problems among older adults. Geriatric Nursing. In Print. Full article

Abstract. Poor sleep is common among older adults, often caused by multiple underlying factors such as chronic stress. Poor sleep is subsequently associated with negative health outcomes including higher morbidity and mortality.

Our primary purpose is to explore practical non-pharmacological intervention approaches integrating stress management to improve sleep quality among older adults. In doing so, we highlight approaches that appear to hold promise in real-world settings with older individuals.

We conducted a tailored literature review specifically on approaches to improve sleep quality among older adults, with emphasis on those integrating stress management. Online search engines were reviewed to identify research in these areas.

Various non-pharmacological intervention approaches, such as mindfulness and cognitive behavioral therapy, have shown promise in improving sleep quality and health outcomes within this population. Those integrating chronic stress management appear to be particularly successful. Thus further development of multidimensional sleep interventions integrating stress management with seniors is warranted.

Meditation and cardiovascular risk

Jamerson, K., et al. (2017). Meditation and Cardiovascular Risk. Journal of the American Heart Association. Vol. 6, no. 10, 

From the Abstract. Despite numerous advances in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Novel and inexpensive interventions that can contribute to the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease are of interest. Numerous studies have reported on the benefits of meditation. …

Neurophysiological and neuroanatomical studies demonstrate that meditation can have long‐standing effects on the brain, which provide some biological plausibility for beneficial consequences on the physiological basal state and on cardiovascular risk. Studies of the effects of meditation on cardiovascular risk have included those investigating physiological response to stress, smoking cessation, blood pressure reduction, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome, endothelial function, inducible myocardial ischemia, and primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. …

Overall, studies of meditation suggest a possible benefit on cardiovascular risk, although the overall quality and, in some cases, quantity of study data are modest. Given the low costs and low risks of this intervention, meditation may be considered as an adjunct to guideline‐directed cardiovascular risk reduction by those interested in this lifestyle modification, with the understanding that the benefits of such intervention remain to be better established.

Integrity in mindfulness-based research

Crane, R.S. & Hecht, F.M. “Intervention Integrity in Mindfulness-Based Research.” Mindfulness (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-018-0886-3. Full Text.

From the Abstract. Assessing program or intervention fidelity/integrity is an important methodological consideration in clinical and educational research. These critical variables influence the degree to which outcomes can be attributed to the program and the success of the transition from research to practice and back again.

Research in the Mindfulness-Based Program (MBP) field has been expanding rapidly over the last 20 years, but little attention has been given to how to assess intervention integrity within research and practice settings. The proliferation of different program forms, inconsistency in adhering to published curriculum guides, and variability of training levels and competency of trial teachers all pose grave risks to the sustainable development of the science of MBPs going forward.

Mindfulness-based psycho-education for people with schizophrenia

Chien, W., Bressington, D., Yip, A., & Karatzias, T. (2017). An international multi-site, randomized controlled trial of a mindfulness-based psychoeducation group programme for people with schizophrenia. Psychological Medicine, 47(12), 2081-2096. doi:10.1017/S0033291717000526. Full access. 

From the Abstract. Compared with treatment as usual (TAU) and conventional psychoeducation group (CPEG0), mindfulness-based psychoeducation group (MBPEG) improves remission and hospitalization rates of people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders over 24 months.


Employees’ mental health and MBSR (review)

Janssen, M., et al. (2018). Effects of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction on employees’ mental health: A systematic review. PloS one13(1), e0191332. Full text.

From the Abstract. The purpose of this exploratory study was to obtain greater insight into the effects of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) on the mental health of employees.

Based on our analysis, the strongest outcomes were reduced levels of emotional exhaustion (a dimension of burnout), stress, psychological distress, depression, anxiety, and occupational stress. Improvements were found in terms of mindfulness, personal accomplishment (a dimension of burnout), (occupational) self-compassion, quality of sleep, and relaxation.

Mindfulness and ADHD

Hoxhaj, E., et al., (2018). Mindfulness vs psychoeducation in adult ADHD: a randomized controlled trial. European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience, 1-15. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00406-018-0868-4. Summary and References

From the Abstract:

BACKGROUND. Mindfulness training is a promising treatment approach in adult ADHD. However, there has not yet been a randomized controlled trial comparing mindfulness to an active control condition. In this study, we assessed the efficacy of a mindfulness training program (MAP) compared to structured psychoeducation (PE).

CONCLUSIONS. In the current study, MAP was not superior to PE regarding symptom reduction in adult ADHD. Both interventions, mindfulness meditation and PE, were efficacious in reducing symptom load in adult ADHD. Furthermore in exploratory post hoc tests the study provides evidence for a potential gender-specific treatment response in adult ADHD.