After stroke, people may derive a range of benefits from mindfulness-based interventions

Lawrence, M., Booth, J., Mercer, S., & Crawford, E. (2013). A systematic review of the benefits of mindfulness‐based interventions following transient ischemic attack and stroke. International Journal of Stroke, 8(6), 465-474. Abstract.

Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between perceived psychological stress and ischemic stroke. A feature of stroke is recurrence; 30–40% within five-years following first transient ischemic attack/stroke. Equipping patients with skills and coping strategies to help reduce or manage perceived psychological stress may represent an important secondary prevention intervention. Mindfulness-based interventions are structured, group-based self-management programmes with potential to help people with long-term conditions cope better with physical, psychological, or emotional distress. Review evidence suggests significant benefits across a range of physical and mental health problems. However, we could find no evidence synthesis relating specifically to the benefits of mindfulness-based interventions following transient ischemic attack and stroke.

The review aims to evaluate the benefits of mindfulness-based interventions following transient ischemic attack/stroke. Four studies involving 160 participants were reviewed. Three papers reported mindfulness-based interventions delivered to groups; one paper reported a mindfulness-based intervention which was delivered one to one. The results demonstrate a positive trend in favor of the benefits of mindfulness-based interventions across a range of psychological, physiological, and psychosocial outcomes including anxiety, depression, mental fatigue, blood pressure, perceived health, and quality of life. No evidence of harm was found.

Conclusion: Following transient ischemic attack/stroke, people may derive a range of benefits from mindfulness-based interventions; however, further methodologically robust trials are required

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s