Posted in brain research, meditation, mindfulness

Reduces anxiety by shrinking self-referential thoughts

Zeidan, F., Martucci, K. T., Kraft, R. A., McHaffie, J. G., & Coghill, R. C. (2013). Neural correlates of mindfulness meditation-related anxiety relief. Social cognitive and affective neuroscience. Epub ahead of print, April 24, 2013. Full text.

Abstract: Anxiety is the cognitive state related to the inability to control emotional responses to perceived threats. Anxiety is inversely related to brain activity associated with the cognitive regulation of emotions. Mindfulness meditation has been found to regulate anxiety. However, the brain mechanisms involved in meditation-related anxiety relief are largely unknown.

We employed pulsed arterial spin labeling MRI to compare the effects of distraction in the form of attending to the breath (ATB) (before meditation training) to mindfulness meditation (after meditation training) on state anxiety across the same subjects. Fifteen healthy subjects, with no prior meditation experience, participated in 4 days of mindfulness meditation training.

ATB did not reduce state anxiety, but state anxiety was significantly reduced in every session that subjects meditated. Meditation-related anxiety relief was associated with activation of the anterior cingulate cortex, ventromedial prefrontal cortex and anterior insula. Meditation-related activation in these regions exhibited a strong relationship to anxiety relief when compared to ATB. During meditation, those who exhibited greater default-related activity (i.e., posterior cingulate cortex) reported greater anxiety, possibly reflecting an inability to control self-referential thoughts.

These findings provide evidence that mindfulness meditation attenuates anxiety through mechanisms involved in the regulation of self-referential thought processes.

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2 thoughts on “Reduces anxiety by shrinking self-referential thoughts

  1. Thanks for posting these articles, Peter. They are always interesting and ‘thought’ provoking, and provide links for further reading.

  2. I too find them of interest, Fran. Meditation seems to be ‘invading’ many fields of healing. Glad to see that scientists are able to measure and validate what’s been known intuitively for thousands of years.

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