Cultivating emotional balance: two case studies

Weininger, Radhule, et al. “The Mindful Pause: Cultivating Emotional Balance through Mindfulness.” No date. Full text.

Abstract. The Buddhist technique named Mindfulness has become widespread in clinical
practice as a way to approach mental and emotional well being. The mindful pause is described as a way to interrupt habitual reactivity and engage compassionately.

It forms a step in the Emotional Awareness Process (EAP) and the Compassionate
Choice Process (CCP), which have been developed as therapeutic techniques
grounded in both Buddhist and neuroscientific contexts.

Two case examples of application of the processes illustrate how these new therapeutic interventions may prove beneficial in clinical practice. Lastly, more potential applications are proposed, and possible limitations, future projects and research noted.

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Improved visual, motor, anxiety, and mindfulness among grade 4-5 children

Tarrasch, Ricardo, Lilach Margalit-Shalom, and Rony Berger. “Enhancing Visual Perception and Motor Accuracy among School Children through a Mindfulness and Compassion Program.” Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 8, 2017, pp. 281. Full text.

From the Introduction. The present study assessed the effects of the mindfulness/compassion cultivating program on the performance in visual perception (VP) and motor accuracy, as well as on anxiety levels and self-reported mindfulness among 4th and 5th grade students.

One hundred and thirty-eight children participated in the program for 24 weekly sessions, while 78 children served as controls. . . . [T]ests revealed significant improvements in the four aforementioned measures in the experimental group only. In addition, significant correlations were obtained between the improvement in motor accuracy and the reduction in anxiety and the increase in mindfulness.

Since VP and motor accuracy are basic skills associated with quantifiable academic characteristics, such as reading and mathematical abilities, the results may suggest that mindfulness practice has the ability to improve academic achievements.