A mindful approach to diabetes self-management

DiNardo, Monica, et al. “A Mindful Approach to Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support for Veterans.” The Diabetes Educator, vol. 43, no. 6, pp. 608-20. https://doi.org/10.1177/0145721717738019

From the Abstract. The study used a single-group pretest-posttest repeated-measures design. The 90-minute Mind-STRIDE training, adapted from Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR), was provided as the final component of a half-day diabetes self-management education class at a Veterans Affairs (VA) outpatient diabetes clinic.

Following initial training, participants were asked to practice mindfulness at home for 10 minutes each day during the 3-month study. Study recruitment and retention were calculated as rates. Veteran and diabetes educator satisfaction were assessed by rating scales and open-ended comments. Psychosocial-behavioral and metabolic outcomes were assessed at baseline and 3 months after initial training.

Overall, participants and diabetes educators were highly satisfied with the Mind-STRIDE intervention. Significant improvements were found in diabetes distress, diabetes self-efficacy, [and] diabetes self-management behaviors.

Results suggest feasibility, satisfaction, and positive preliminary effects. Efficacy testing by randomized controlled trial with analysis of covariance structures is warranted.

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Decreasing stress and implicit racism

Fitzgerald, Carey J., and Adam K. Lueke. “Mindfulness increases analytical thought and decreases just world beliefs.” Current Research in Social Psychology, 2017. Published online. Full text.

Excerpts. growing body of research has found that engaging in mindfulness may alter thought processes in a range of different manners, such as increasing psychological well-being, decreasing stress, decreasing implicit racism, and many other positive psychological effects. The present study investigated whether engaging in mindfulness meditation would influence analytical thought processes.

The results from this study are consistent with previous mindfulness studies that have also found cognitive improvements when participants enter a mindfulness state. This study adds to the growing body of literature another positive effect of mindfulness that had not yet been studied – analytical perspectives and beliefs in a just world. This experiment, much like the previous mindfulness experiments, illustrates the importance of implementing mindfulness on a larger scale. This technique improves memory, self-control, implicit biases, and rational thinking.